Fascination (Miles Mander, 1931)

fascinationThis review is my contribution to the Madeleine Carroll Blogathon being organised by Silver Screenings and Tales of the Easily Distracted – please do visit and read the other postings!

By sheer serendipity, I heard news of the Madeleine Carroll blogathon just after hearing that one of her early British talkies, Fascination, was about to be released on DVD in the UK. How could I resist? Just over an hour long, this melodrama laced with comedy sees Carroll cast as a world-weary actress (she was only 25, but the character seems to be several years older) who tempts a young interior decorator into cheating on his wife. The director was Miles Mander, a British dramatist and actor who had already directed and starred opposite Carroll in silent film The First Born, based on his own play.

Sadly, the film is in pretty bad shape despite BFI restorers’ expertise (it only survives in a damaged nitrate print), and subtitles are provided to help viewers make out the dialogue. Adapted from a stage play, the film does feel stagy at times and some of the dialogue and acting are stilted.  Nevertheless, I feel it is worth seeing if you enjoy early talkies, and it is a fascinating example of Carroll’s British film work. The film also gets steadily better as it goes on – the beginning is rather shaky, but later on it ratchets up the tension, as the love triangle takes its toll on everyone concerned.

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